Category: College

Librarian’s Estate Plan Includes $4 Million Gift to School

 

A former University of New Hampshire librarian’s $4 million gift to the school has received considerable attention due to the way the school opted to use the funds. This uproar is a reminder that estate planning is important, especially if you’re particular about the way you want your money used. 11-02-16

This is the message in the credit.com article “The Lesson We Can All Learn From the Librarian Who Left a Fortune to His Former Employer.”

Robert Morin, a university librarian for nearly 50 years, gave his entire estate to the school when he died in 2015. He designated that $100,000 go to the library but didn’t say how the remaining money should be spent, according to UNH. The school said it plans to spend $2.5 million of the proceeds on a student career center, and another $1 million on a video scoreboard for the school’s football stadium.

The scoreboard upset some people. They said using 10 times the amount dedicated to the library for a scoreboard goes against Morin’s interests—especially his austere lifestyle—which is the reason he could save such a large sum of money.

Think about the amount of flexibility we have in dictating our wishes when it comes to leaving money to others in our estates. A will or living trust can give instructions to do anything that’s not illegal, so you can put in pretty much anything you want.
Here are a few things to consider when deciding who will receive proceeds from your estate and how much:

Specific Amounts. Use caution when stating specific dollar amounts in your will or trust, especially when coupling charities and family as beneficiaries. An estate can lose value over time, so the $100,000 you want to leave to the Alley Cat Allies can sound terrific when your estate is valued at $1 million. However, if it plummets to $150,000, it will leave little for your family. Instead, use a percentage of the estate instead of a specific dollar amount and add a restriction that the amount is not to exceed a specific dollar amount.

Name Charities as Beneficiaries. Rather than mixing charities and family members in your will, make a charity a beneficiary of a retirement account. The money will then go to the charity tax-free, and, if you want to change which charity receives your donation, you only need to change the beneficiary on your IRA or 401K instead of rewriting your will.

As with most estate-planning issues, it’s smart to speak with a qualified estate planning lawyer instead of trying to do it yourself—especially if you have substantial assets and/or multiple beneficiaries.

Reference: credit.com (Sept. 19, 2016) “The Lesson We Can All Learn From the Librarian Who Left a Fortune to His Former Employer”

Make Certain Your College-Bound Kid Has Packed a Health Care Power of Attorney

You thought you purchased just about everything for your child for college, but don’t forget one more important item: a health care power of attorney or health proxy.

When a child turns 18, parents don’t have much authority under federal law to remotely access medical records or make decision. With the medical privacy law HIPAA, you 10-28-16need to have your child’s written permission.

CBS News’ recent article, “Don't send your child to college without this,” suggests a health care proxy. It’s a pretty simple legal document that gives you the authority to make medical decisions and access their records if they’re disabled. Talk about a critical back-to-school item!

A health care power of attorney is critically important when a child has a health emergency at college.

A HIPAA authorization allows you access to your child’s medical records, which are protected by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Your child is an adult, so you can’t call the health center at college and get his or her detailed health information without an authorization.

The health care proxy is more complicated. The one signing it is giving another the authority to make medical decisions for them if they become incapacitated. An agent for health decisions is appointed with the proxy. The proxy covers a broad range of powers, and parents or other trusted individuals who are agents are allowed to speak with doctors, approve tests and examine medical records.

Prior to getting these forms, you should have a serious conversation with your college student on why the documents are important. The proxy talks about some unpleasant decision making—like specifying what treatment or care a person on life support wants and stipulating organ donation and other post-mortem issues. Some of the more detailed proxies have a questionnaire that runs through end-of-life or advanced “health care directive” decisions. As a parent, this is tough language to read, and these are difficult issues to discuss. Nonetheless, they provoke some serious thinking about quality of life in the event of a health emergency.

It’s important to know what the documents can and can’t do: they don’t ensure quality care, and you’ll still need to consult with doctors. Be sure you fully comprehend what these documents mean and how you can modify them.

Speak with your estate planning lawyer and appoint trusted family members or friends to make decisions if you or your spouse/partner can’t. You should also, at the same time, review your own estate plan. If you don’t have a will, powers of attorney or living trust, find out which documents are appropriate for your situation.

Reference: CBS News (September 9, 2016) “Don't send your child to college without this”